Our Certification Standards

Updated: January 3, 2017

At Bestowed, we are committed to introducing consumers to the highest-quality, most nutritionally sound, best-tasting products on the market. Every product that we certify is extensively reviewed and tested by our team of nutrition and health experts, led by Heather Bauer, RD CDN. Our certification process is extensive and we do not compromise.

What We Certify

  • Food
  • Beverage
  • Some vitamins & supplements (ingestible)

Our Standards

  • Made with all-natural ingredients
  • No artificial preservatives, colors, flavors or sweeteners
  • No trans fat, partially-hydrogenated oils or high fructose corn syrup
  • Does not contain any of the unacceptable ingredients listed below
  • Organic, whenever possible
  • Made with sustainably-sourced ingredients
  • Nutritionally sound (see below)

    To browse a categorized listing of Bestowed Certified products, click here.

    Program Governance

    Our certification program is overseen by Heather Bauer, RD CDN. Heather is a practicing nutritionist, best-selling author, Huffington Post & USNews columnist, and Bestowed's founder. You can learn more about Heather here.

    Unacceptable Ingredients

    A

    • acesulfame-K (acesulfame potassium)
    • acetylated esters of mono- and diglycerides
    • ammonium chloride
    • artificial colors
    • artificial flavors
    • aspartame
    • azodicarbonamide

    B

    • benzoates in food
    • benzoyl peroxide
    • BHA (butylated hydroxyanisole)
    • BHT (butylated hydroxytoluene)
    • bleached flour
    • bromated flour
    • brominated vegetable oil (BVO)

    C

    • calcium bromate
    • calcium disodium EDTA
    • calcium peroxide
    • calcium propionate
    • calcium saccharin
    • calcium sorbate
    • calcium stearoyl-2-lactylate
    • caprocaprylobehenin
    • carmine
    • certified colors
    • cyclamates
    • cysteine (l-cysteine), as an additive for bread products

    D

    • DATEM (Diacetyl tartaric and fatty acid esters of mono and diglycerides)
    • dimethylpolysiloxane
    • dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (DSS)
    • disodium calcium EDTA
    • disodium dihydrogen EDTA
    • disodium guanylate
    • disodium inosinate

    E

    • EDTA
    • ethyl vanillin
    • ethylene oxide
    • ethoxyquin

    F

    • FD & C colors
    • foie gras

    G

    • GMP (disodium guanylate)

    H

    • hexa-, hepta- and octa-esters of sucrose
    • high fructose corn syrup
    • hydrogenated fats

    I

    • IMP (disodium inosinate)

    L

    • lactylated esters of mono- and diglycerides
    • lead soldered cans

    M

    • methyl silicon
    • methylparaben
    • microparticularized whey protein derived fat substitute
    • monosodium glutamate (MSG)

    N

    • natamycin
    • nitrates/nitrites

    P

    • partially hydrogenated oil
    • polydextrose
    • potassium benzoate
    • potassium bromate
    • potassium sorbate
    • propionates
    • propyl gallate
    • propylparaben

    S

    • saccharin
    • sodium aluminum sulfate
    • sodium benzoate
    • sodium diacetate
    • sodium glutamate
    • sodium nitrate/nitrite
    • sodium propionate
    • sodium stearoyl-2-lactylate
    • solvent extracted oils, as standalone single-ingredient oils (except grapeseed oil).
    • sorbic acid
    • sucralose
    • sucroglycerides
    • sucrose polyester
    • sulfites (except in wines, meads and ciders)

    T

    • TBHQ (tertiary butylhydroquinone)
    • tetrasodium EDTA

    V

    • vanillin

    What Does Nutritionally Sound Mean?

    Recommended Daily Caloric Intake

    This table represents the recommended caloric intake we base our sound nutrition values on for men and women. 

    Sound Nutrition Values by Intended Use

    While "nutritionally sound" may appear to be a subjective and ambiguous term, we've gone to great lengths to define what it really means. See the table below for what we hold to be sound nutrition values for food & beverage products, broken down by their intended use: 

    Rationale for Sound Nutrition Values

    Rationale for nutritional rules set forth to define sound nutritional value of products with the Bestowed label are as follows. It is important to note that the following parameters are based on the average healthy adult in the United States.

    Women

    Intended use→Weight loss – a product that has an intended use to assist the consumer in losing body weight with label claims, including product name, which may or may not suggest that the product is a good option for someone who wants to lose weight. Any food or beverage item to be marketed as a meal replacement for these meals ought to have less than the following amounts of macronutrients and micronutrients based on a premise that when eating 3 meals and 2 snacks per day, the consumer’s total caloric intake will more likely than not, assist the consumer in losing weight, when the product is consumed as a part of a similarly calorically valued lunch and dinner.

    • Breakfast/Lunch/Dinner:
        1. Calorie level: To calculate an appropriate caloric range for products with the intended use of weight loss in women, we approached it with the following rationale. The current average height for an adult woman in the US is about 5 feet, 4 inches. To be within an appropriate body mass index or BMI, this would equate to a weight in pounds of, 108-132 lbs, accounting for the variations in frame size. The average basal metabolic rate or BMR for adult women at this size is about 1350 calories per day, not accounting for activity level. Based on these values, we have deemed that a food or beverage intended to support weight loss in adult women should not exceed 300 calories for breakfast, 350 calories for lunch, and 400 calories for dinner, to equate to 1050 calories at the maximum amounts allowed and with room for two other snacks throughout the day.
        2. Protein level: meals with a protein content valued at greater than 25 grams per serving, per meal have been proven to be assistive in the goal of weight loss. For this reason, we delineated protein values to be greater than this at breakfast and lunch and to have a higher amount at dinner, to account for dinner to be the largest meal of the day. In addition, this amount of protein at the minimum, at each meal, for the average woman’s weight described in the previous section, equates to between 1.7 grams’ protein/kg/day – 0.7 grams’ protein/kg/day based on 108-132 lbs respectively. It is expected that the consumer would also be ingesting two snacks with protein per day in addition to this amount.
        3. Fat level: the fat level of the products intended for meal replacement shall not exceed 10 grams per serving for breakfast, lunch, and 15 grams per serving for dinner. Products shall also have no more than 2% from saturated fat sources. However, products with coconut oil as the source of fat will not be held to this standard. Per the American Heart Association recommendations to have no more than 7% of total daily calories from saturated fat, and at a calorie estimation of 1350 calories per day, would equate to a daily saturated fat intake that should not exceed 10.5 grams.
        4. Fiber level: Recommended fiber intakes for adult women are currently at 25 grams per day with some variation for ages within adulthood. Therefore, a product intended as a meal replacement ought to contain greater than 5 grams of fiber per serving with the rationale that the consumer ought to also be consuming two additional meals with at least this much fiber, along with two snacks containing fiber. At this minimum of 5 grams of fiber for each meal, it would meet 44% of estimated daily fiber intake recommendations at the lowest end of the recommendation. We feel this is the lowest acceptable amount of fiber that ought to be containing in the products described above, with this intention.
        5. Sugar level: This is referencing added sugars to the products. If the product has dried fruit and/or fresh fruit, we understand the sugar content will exceed this amount and that is acceptable as 100% fruit juice and dried fruits offer additional nutritional benefits that added sugar does not. Per the American Heart Association, the recommended daily maximum amount of added sugars for adult women should be about 25 grams per day. For a product intended for a meal replacement, if consuming a similar nutrition profile for all three meals, would equate to no more than 8 grams of added sugar per serving, per meal. Three meals per day, at this maximum amount of added sugar of 8 grams per serving, per meal, would equate to the maximum recommended amount of added sugar per day for women. This is not including any added sugars consumed in beverages or snacks.
    • Mid-morning snack and afternoon snack: 
        1. Calorie level: To calculate an appropriate caloric range for products with the intended use of weight loss in women, we approached it with the following rationale. Based on the above explanation of criteria for products with the intention of being used as a meal replacement for adult women, we believe the calorie ranges for mid-morning snack and afternoon snack with the intention of assisting with weight loss, should fit within that total daily average of 1350 calories per day whereas the mid-morning snack value does not exceed 80 calories per serving and the afternoon snack does not exceed 200 calories per serving.
        2. Protein level: As the calorie levels of snacks are lower than the recommended calorie levels for meals, the respective protein levels are recommended to be greater than 2 grams per serving per snack for mid-morning snacks and greater than 5 grams per serving per snack for afternoon snacks. Providing some protein in a product with the intention of weight loss is supportive of that intention. However, in order to fit within the caloric requirements of snacks, we have described a minimum amount of protein in the products intended for use as snacks.
        3. Fat level: the fat level of the snack products intended for use by women who want to lose weight shall not exceed 5 grams per serving for either mid-morning snack or afternoon snack. Products shall also have no more than 2% of total fat from saturated fat sources. However, products with coconut oil as the source of fat will not be held to the standard of needing to have no more than 2% of total fat from saturated fat due to the metabolism and health benefits associated with ingestion of coconut oil.  
        4. Fiber level: The recommended fiber intake for adult women  is about 25 grams per day with some minor variation within the adult age range. As we have requirements for fiber content in products intended for meal replacement, we have set a minimum amount of fiber required in products intended for use in women who want to lose weight as a minimum of 1 gram of fiber per serving per snack, regardless if it is a mid-morning snack or an afternoon snack.  
        5. Sugar level: This is referencing added sugars to the products. If the product has dried fruit and/or fresh fruit, we understand the sugar content will exceed this amount and that is acceptable as 100% fruit juice and dried fruits offer additional nutritional benefits that added sugar does not. Per the American Heart Association, the recommended daily maximum amount of added sugars for adult women should be 25 grams per day, respectively. As explained above, for a product intended for a meal replacement, if consuming in similar nutrition content for all three meals, would equate to no more than 8 grams of added sugar per serving, per meal. Three meals per day, at this maximum amount of added sugar of 8 grams per serving, per meal, would equate to the maximum recommended amount of added sugar per day for women. We have currently set forth a minimum amount of added sugar per serving in snacks with the intention of weight loss in women as less than 5 grams of added sugar regardless of if it is a mid-morning snack or afternoon snack. We understand that some sugar may be added to improve palatability in certain products but feel that it should not result in an excess amount of added sugar. 

    Weight maintenance/no designation regarding intention for weight loss/weight gain or other – a product that has an intended use to not contribute to excessive weight gain by the consumer, if consumed as directed on product specific package label, with suggested serving size, as defined by more than 2 lbs of weight per week and as defined by having the following parameters. Product also does not claim to assist or promote weight loss in the consumer with brand packaging, including the name of the product.

      • Breakfast/Lunch/Dinner: 
          1. Calorie level: To calculate an appropriate caloric range for products with the intended use of weight maintenance or no designation of intention in women, we approached it with the following rationale. The current average height for an adult woman in the US is about 5 feet, 4 inches. To be within an appropriate body mass index or BMI, this would equate to a weight in pounds of, 108-132 lbs, accounting for the variations in frame size. This also does not account for any physical activity of any kind and we recognize that products without the designation for intended use of assisting with weight loss, can appropriately contain more calories per serving, without being excessive enough to result in weight loss of more than 2 lbs per week if consumed per product suggested serving size. Therefore, we have decided upon maximum levels for calories for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, with the inclusion of two snacks per day, that when consumed at the max, would not exceed 2000 calories per day.
          2. Protein level: the minimum amount of protein recommended for women is 0.8 grams per kg of weight. For this reason, we have set a minimum amount of protein to be greater than 10 grams per serving for those products intended for meal replacement in someone who wants to lose weight.
          3. Fat level: the fat level of the products intended for meal replacement shall be less than 20 grams per serving. Products shall also have no more than 2% from saturated fat sources. However, products with coconut oil as the source of fat will not be held to this standard. Per the American Heart Association recommendations to have no more than 7% of total daily calories from saturated fat, and at a calorie level at a minimum of 2000 calories per day, would equate to a daily saturated fat intake that should not exceed 15.5 grams.
          4. Fiber level: Recommended fiber intakes for adult women are 25 grams per day with some variation with ages within adulthood. Therefore, a product intended as a meal replacement for weight maintenance ought to contain greater than 5 grams of fiber per serving with the rationale that the consumer ought to also be consuming two additional meals with at least this much fiber, along with two snacks containing fiber. At this minimum of 5 grams of fiber for each meal, it would meet 44% of estimated daily fiber intake recommendations at the lowest end of the recommendation. We feel this is the lowest acceptable amount of fiber that ought to be containing in the products described above, with this intention.
          5. Sugar level: This is referencing added sugars to the products. If the product has dried fruit and/or fresh fruit, we understand the sugar content will exceed this amount and that is acceptable as 100% fruit juice and dried fruits offer additional nutritional benefits that added sugar does not. Per the American Heart Association, the recommended daily maximum amount of added sugars for adult women should be 25 grams per day, respectively. For a product intended for a meal replacement, if consuming in similar nutrition content for all three meals, would equate to no more than 8 grams of added sugar per serving, per meal. Three meals per day, at this maximum amount of added sugar of 8 grams per serving, per meal, would equate to the maximum recommended amount of added sugar per day for women. This is not including any added sugars consumed in beverages or snacks.
      • Mid-morning snack and afternoon snack: 
          1. Calorie level: To calculate an appropriate caloric range for products with no intended use or weight maintenance in women, we approached it with the following rationale. Based on the above explanation of criteria for products with the intention of being used as a meal replacement for adult women, we believe the calorie ranges for mid-morning snack and afternoon snack should fit within that total daily average of 2000 calories per day whereas the mid-morning snack value does not exceed 200 calories per serving and the afternoon snack does not exceed 350 calories per serving.
          2. Protein level: the minimum amount of protein recommended for women is 0.8 grams per kg of weight. For this reason, we have set a minimum amount of protein to be greater than 5 grams per serving for those products with no intention or intended for a snack in someone who wants to maintain weight.
          3. Fat level: the fat level of the products with no intention or with the intention to support weight maintenance, shall not exceed 10 grams per serving in order to not provide more than 45% estimated calories from fat for snacks. Products shall also have no more than 2% from saturated fat sources. However, products with coconut oil as the source of fat will not be held to this standard. Per the American Heart Association recommendations to have no more than 7% of total daily calories from saturated fat, and at a calorie level at a minimum of 2000 calories per day, would equate to a daily saturated fat intake that should not exceed 15.5 grams.
          4. Fiber level: The recommended fiber intake for adult women  is about 25 grams per day with some minor variation within the adult age range. As we have requirements for fiber content in products intended for meal replacement, we have set a minimum amount of fiber required in products intended for use in women who want to maintain weight as a minimum of 1 gram of fiber per serving per snack, regardless if it is a mid-morning snack or an afternoon snack.
          5. Sugar level: This is referencing added sugars to the products. If the product has dried fruit and/or fresh fruit, we understand the sugar content will exceed this amount and that is acceptable as 100% fruit juice and dried fruits offer additional nutritional benefits that added sugar does not. Per the American Heart Association, the recommended daily maximum amount of added sugars for adult women should be 25 grams per day, respectively. As explained above, for a product intended for a meal replacement, if consuming in similar nutrition content for all three meals, would equate to no more than 8 grams of added sugar per serving, per meal. Three meals per day, at this maximum amount of added sugar of 8 grams per serving, per meal, would equate to the maximum recommended amount of added sugar per day for women. We have currently set forth a minimum amount of added sugar per serving in snacks with the intention of weight maintenance in women as less than 5 grams of added sugar regardless of if it is a mid-morning snack or afternoon snack. We understand that some sugar may be added to improve palatability in certain products but feel that it should not result in an excess amount of added sugar.  

      Men

      Intended use→Weight loss  a product that has an intended use to assist the consumer in losing body weight with label claims, including product name, which may or may not suggest that the product is a good option for someone who wants to lose weight. Any food or beverage item to be marketed as a meal replacement for these meals ought to have less than the following amounts of macronutrients and micronutrients based on a premise that when eating 3 meals and 2 snacks per day, the consumer’s total caloric intake will more likely than not, assist the consumer in losing weight, when the product is consumed as a part of a similarly calorically valued lunch and dinner.

        • Breakfast/Lunch/Dinner 
            1. Calorie level: To calculate an appropriate caloric range for products with the intended use of weight loss in men, we approached it with the following rationale. The current average height for an adult man in the US is about 5 feet, 9 inches. To be within an appropriate body mass index or BMI, this would equate to a weight in pounds of, 128-169 lbs, accounting for the variations in frame size. These values result in an average  basal metabolic rate or BMR of, about 1700 calories per day without accounting for physical activity. For this reason we have defined products with the intended use for weight loss in adult men contain less than 300 calories for breakfast, less than 350 calories for lunch, and less than 400 calories for dinner so with the cumulative ingestion of these as well as two snacks per day, will result in an intake of 1330 calories per day, which is well below the BMR for an average adult male. In order to meet product guidelines for both men and women, and being unable to delineate between which gender would actually be the consumer, we aired on the more conservative side in order to provide appropriate levels for women as well.
            2. Protein level: meals with a protein content valued at greater than 25 grams per serving, per meal have been proven to be assistive in the goal of weight loss. For this reason, we delineated protein values to be greater than this at breakfast and lunch and to have a higher amount at dinner, to account for dinner to be the largest meal of the day. In addition, this amount of protein at the minimum, at each meal, for the average man’s weight described in the previous section, equates to between 1.1 grams protein/kg/day – 1.5 grams protein/kg/day based on the previously described average weight for males. It is expected that the consumer would also be ingesting two snacks with protein per day in addition to this amount.
            3. Fat level: the fat level of the products intended for meal replacement shall not exceed 10 grams per serving for breakfast, lunch, and 15 grams per serving for dinner. Products shall also have no more than 2% from saturated fat sources. However, products with coconut oil as the source of fat will not be held to this standard. Per the American Heart Association recommendations to have no more than 7% of total daily calories from saturated fat, and at a calorie estimation of 1350 calories per day, would equate to a daily saturated fat intake that should not exceed 10.5 grams.
            4. Fiber level: Recommended fiber intakes for adult men is about 38 grams per day depending on age within adulthood. Therefore, a product intended as a meal replacement ought to contain greater than 5 grams of fiber per serving with the rationale that the consumer ought to also be consuming two additional meals with at least this much fiber, along with two snacks containing fiber. At this minimum of 5 grams of fiber for each meal, it would meet 39% of estimated daily fiber intake recommendations at the lowest end of the recommendation. We feel this is the lowest acceptable amount of fiber that ought to be containing in the products described above, with this intention.
            5. Sugar level: This is referencing added sugars to the products. If the product has dried fruit and/or fresh fruit, we understand the sugar content will exceed this amount and that is acceptable as 100% fruit juice and dried fruits offer additional nutritional benefits that added sugar does not. Per the American Heart Association, the recommended daily maximum amount of added sugars for adult men should be 38 grams per day, respectively. For a product intended for a meal replacement, if consuming in similar nutrition content for all three meals, would equate to no more than 8 grams of added sugar per serving, per meal. Three meals per day, at this maximum amount of added sugar of 8 grams per serving, per meal, would equate to the maximum recommended amount of added sugar per day for men. This is not including any added sugars consumed in beverages or snacks.
          • Mid-morning snack and afternoon snack: 
              1. Calorie level: To calculate an appropriate caloric range for products with the intended use of weight loss in men, we approached it with the following rationale. The current average height for an adult man in the US is about 5 feet, 9 inches. To be within an appropriate body mass index or BMI, this would equate to a weight in pounds of, 128-169 lbs, accounting for the variations in frame size. Based on the above explanation of criteria for products with the intention of being used as a meal replacement for adult men, we believe the calorie ranges for mid-morning snack and afternoon snack with the intention of assisting with weight loss, should fit within that total daily average of 1700 calories per day whereas the mid-morning snack value does not exceed 80 calories per serving and the afternoon snack does not exceed 200 calories per serving.
              2. Protein level: As the calorie levels of snacks are lower than the recommended calorie levels for meals, the respective protein levels are recommended to be greater than 2 grams per serving per snack for mid-morning snacks and greater than 5 grams per serving per snack for afternoon snacks. Providing some protein in a product with the intention of weight loss is supportive of that intention. However, in order to fit within the caloric requirements of snacks, we have described a minimum amount of protein in the products intended for use as snacks.
              3. Fat level: the fat level of the snack products intended for use by men who want to lose weight shall not exceed 5 grams per serving for either mid-morning snack or afternoon snack. Products shall also have no more than 2% of total fat from saturated fat sources. However, products with coconut oil as the source of fat will not be held to the standard of needing to have no more than 2% of total fat from saturated fat due to the metabolism and health benefits associated with ingestion of coconut oil.
              4. Fiber level: The recommended fiber intake for adult men  is about 38 grams per day with some minor variation within the adult age range. As we have requirements for fiber content in products intended for meal replacement, we have set a minimum amount of fiber required in products with the intended use in men who want to lose weight as a minimum of 1 gram of fiber per serving per snack, regardless if it is a mid-morning snack or an afternoon snack.  
              5. Sugar level: This is referencing added sugars to the products. If the product has dried fruit and/or fresh fruit, we understand the sugar content will exceed this amount and that is acceptable as 100% fruit juice and dried fruits offer additional nutritional benefits that added sugar does not. Per the American Heart Association, the recommended daily maximum amount of added sugars for adult men should be 38 grams per day, respectively. As explained above, for a product intended for a meal replacement, if consuming in similar nutrition content for all three meals, would equate to no more than 8 grams of added sugar per serving, per meal. Three meals per day, at this maximum amount of added sugar of 8 grams per serving, per meal, would almost equate to the maximum recommended amount of added sugar per day for men. We have currently set forth a minimum amount of added sugar per serving in snacks with the intention of weight loss in men as less than 5 grams of added sugar regardless of if it is a mid-morning snack or afternoon snack. We understand that some sugar may be added to improve palatability in certain products but feel that it should not result in an excess amount of added sugar.

            Intended use → weight maintenance/no designation

              • Breakfast/Lunch/Dinner 
                  1. Calorie level: To calculate an appropriate caloric range for products with no intended use or the intended use of weight maintenance in men, we approached it with the following rationale. The current average height for an adult man in the US is about 5 feet, 9 inches. To be within an appropriate body mass index or BMI, this would equate to a weight in pounds of, 128-169 lbs, accounting for the variations in frame size. This also does not account for any physical activity of any kind and we recognize that products without the designation for intended use of assisting with weight loss, can appropriately contain more calories per serving, without being excessive enough to result in weight loss of more than 2 lbs per week if consumed per product suggested serving size. Therefore, we have decided upon maximum levels for calories for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, with the inclusion of two snacks per day, that when consumed at the max, would not exceed 2000 calories per day.
                  2. Protein level: the minimum amount of protein recommended for men is 0.8 grams per kg of weight. For this reason, we have set a minimum amount of protein to be greater than 10 grams per serving for those products intended for meal replacement in products without an intended use or with the intention of weight maintenance. This would provide an average of about 0.4 grams protein/kg/day – 0.5 grams protein/kg/day with additional protein coming from snacks.
                  3. Fat level: the fat level of the products intended for meal replacement shall be less than 20 grams per serving. Products shall also have no more than 2% from saturated fat sources. However, products with coconut oil as the source of fat will not be held to this standard per the additional health benefits of coconut oil. Per the American Heart Association recommendations to have no more than 7% of total daily calories from saturated fat, and at a calorie level at a minimum of 2000 calories per day, would equate to a daily saturated fat intake that should not exceed 15.5 grams.
                  4. Fiber level: Recommended fiber intakes for adult men is about 38 grams per day depending on age and gender. Therefore, a product intended as a meal replacement ought to contain greater than 5 grams of fiber per serving with the rationale that the consumer ought to also be consuming two additional meals with at least this much fiber, along with two snacks containing fiber. At this minimum of 5 grams of fiber for each meal, it would meet 39% of estimated daily fiber intake recommendations at the lowest end of the recommendation. We feel this is the lowest acceptable amount of fiber that ought to be containing in the products described above, with this intention.
                  5. Sugar level: This is referencing added sugars to the products. If the product has dried fruit and/or fresh fruit, we understand the sugar content will exceed this amount and that is acceptable as 100% fruit juice and dried fruits offer additional nutritional benefits that added sugar does not. Per the American Heart Association, the recommended daily maximum amount of added sugars for adult men should be 38 grams per day, respectively. For a product intended for a meal replacement, if consuming in similar nutrition content for all three meals, would equate to no more than 8 grams of added sugar per serving, per meal. Three meals per day, at this maximum amount of added sugar of 8 grams per serving, per meal, would equate to the maximum recommended amount of added sugar per day for women. This is not including any added sugars consumed in beverages or snacks.
                • Mid-morning snack and afternoon snack: 
                    1. Calorie level: To calculate an appropriate caloric range for products with no intended use or intention of supporting weight maintenance in men, we approached it with the following rationale. The current average height for an adult man in the US is about 5 feet, 9 inches. To be within an appropriate body mass index or BMI, this would equate to a weight in pounds of, 128-169 lbs, accounting for the variations in frame size. Based on the above explanation of criteria for products with the intention of being used as a meal replacement for adult men, we believe the calorie ranges for mid-morning snack and afternoon snack should fit within that total daily average of 2000 calories per day whereas the mid-morning snack value does not exceed 200 calories per serving and the afternoon snack does not exceed 350 calories per serving.
                    2. Protein level: the minimum amount of protein recommended for men is 0.8 grams per kg of weight. For this reason, we have set a minimum amount of protein to be greater than 5 grams per serving for those products intended for use as snacks in someone who wants to maintain weight or whereas the product has no intention regarding weight loss or other. We feel this would support overall appropriate protein intake of 0.8 grams/kg/day in men if meals had at least 10 grams of protein per serving as well and the person cumulatively took in three meals and two snacks per day.
                    3. Fat level: the fat level of the products with no intention or with the intention to support weight maintenance, shall not exceed 10 grams per serving in order to not provide more than 45% estimated calories from fat for snacks. Products shall also have no more than 2% from saturated fat sources. However, products with coconut oil as the source of fat will not be held to this standard. Per the American Heart Association recommendations to have no more than 7% of total daily calories from saturated fat, and at a calorie level at a minimum of 2000 calories per day, would equate to a daily saturated fat intake that should not exceed 15.5 grams.
                    4. Fiber level: The recommended fiber intake for adult men  is about 38 grams per day with some minor variation within the adult age range. As we have requirements for fiber content in products intended for meal replacement, we have set a minimum amount of fiber required in products with no intended use or for men who want to maintain weight as a minimum of 1 gram of fiber per serving per snack, regardless if it is a mid-morning snack or an afternoon snack.  
                    5. Sugar level: This is referencing added sugars to the products. If the product has dried fruit and/or fresh fruit, we understand the sugar content will exceed this amount and that is acceptable as 100% fruit juice and dried fruits offer additional nutritional benefits that added sugar does not. Per the American Heart Association, the recommended daily maximum amount of added sugars for adult men should be 38 grams per day. As explained above, for a product intended for a meal replacement, if consuming in similar nutrition content for all three meals, would equate to no more than 8 grams of added sugar per serving, per meal. Three meals per day, at this maximum amount of added sugar of 8 grams per serving, per meal, would equate to almost the maximum recommended amount of added sugar per day for men. We have currently set forth a minimum amount of added sugar per serving in snacks with the intention of weight maintenance in men as less than 5 grams of added sugar regardless of if it is a mid-morning snack or afternoon snack. We understand that some sugar may be added to improve palatability in certain products but feel that it should not result in an excess amount of added sugar.